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Linux

LINUX FOR WINDOWS USERS

 

I personally find the Linux operating system twice as difficult to use as a windows box. However this is probably because I grew up using windows. Running Linux on a Raspberry pi initially was doubly difficult. In the first few months after the pi’s release it was a bit of a struggle getting stuff to work, due to the OS being so immature. Thanks to the work of many volunteers the packages on Raspbian are improving everyday.

 

However compared to a 1995 Linux installation getting everything up and running is a piece of cake.

 

A lot of work on Linux is done on the command line and not on the GUI desktop.

 

The big differences are all files have read / write and execution permission. On Linux a file has an owner and a group owner. There are three sets of permission bits for each file control how the file is accessed by the owner, by the group owner and finally by everyone else.

 

FAT32 does not support the execution permission bit for files. Therefore under normal circumstances you can not execute a Linux program from a windows partion ( eg FAT32 ). If you unzip a Linux program to a FAT32 partition  and then copy it to a native Linux partition, all the execution bits on the executable files will have been cleared.

 

Linux uses a forward slash character / instead of a back slash \ character to separate file paths.

 

Files names are case sensitive in Linux.

 

Linux does not use drive letter.

 

Partitions are mounted in the file tree inside empty directories.

 

A single forward slash denotes the start of a file tree.

 

The Linux security system grants rights to individuals and collection of individuals called groups. The root user has all the rights. To execute a command as the super user type sudo followed by the command.